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Protein options as a vegetarian?

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Protein options as a vegetarian?

Postby dpvtank » Tue Dec 25, 2007 4:48 pm

Thanks a lot! I hope I'll be able to reach Level 2 soon enough and get started there.

For now, I'm trying to figure out how to substitute get protein into my diet as a vegetarian, and as a student, always on the move. I already eat a lot of fruits and vegetables, and I definitely get my dairy products.

Right now, my protein comes from flax bread toast that I have everyday. I'll have to start using more of flax seeds in my daily diet.
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Postby ucffool » Tue Jan 01, 2008 4:26 pm

We had some community members that would be able to answer that question for you, but they have lapsed a little bit. Hopefully they will come back or others can chime in to help! More nuts maybe?
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Postby dpvtank » Tue Jan 01, 2008 6:59 pm

Don't worry. I'm lapsing as well these two weeks in the Christmas and New Years rush. I should be back on track once I move back to university and start my routine again.

That's pretty much what I'll be doing - sticking with a lot of nuts like walnuts, almonds, etc and finding protein in that.
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Postby splint » Tue Jan 01, 2008 7:39 pm

Maybe a whey or soy protein supplement? I use a whey protein supplement. A scoop mixed with 8 ounces of milk yields about 30 grams of protein. You can mix it with water, juice, rice milk, soy milk too.

I heard too much soy can interfere with muscle building but I don't know the specifics.

I have trouble getting enough protein eating meat, good luck to you.
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Postby Admin » Tue Jan 01, 2008 9:02 pm

Yeah I would avoid the soy to much plant oestrogens whey and egg are great.
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Postby Avraham » Wed Jan 02, 2008 8:22 am

Not an expert - but if you will be using more flax, from what I read, men should not use flax oil, and flax seed will just pass through the system, best is freshly ground flax seed. Sorry I don't have a source to link to.
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Postby dpvtank » Wed Jan 02, 2008 1:59 pm

Week 6
X 1 1 24

I feel good.

Thanks for the tips guys. I'm going to see how flax seeds work grounded. I'm sure I can then add it to a lot of food I eat all day long.
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Postby Admin » Wed Jan 02, 2008 2:14 pm

If you want to up your omega 3's best to get it from fish oil, Carlson liquid is good. For your body to get omega 3 from flax it needs to go through some extra steps to convert that can cascade several ways.
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Postby gwmccull » Wed Jan 02, 2008 11:33 pm

My fiance is a vegetarian, which means I'm a vegetarian 99% of the time. I've never felt like I lacked from protein. From what I've read, if 10-15% of your daily calories come from protein and you get enough calories to cover your daily energy expenditures, then you are receiving enough protein. The only people who suffer from protein deficencies live in Third World countries.

That being said, my main sources of protein come from a variety of sources. My (almost) daily breakfast consists of a homemade mixture of rolled oats, nuts, seeds, multi-grain cereal flakes, etc served with yogurt (I get it from Trader Joe's as it seems to have less sugar than most). I eat the usual eggs, cheese, tofu, peanut butter etc. Quinoa, brown rice and beans in various forms are also good. I try to add nuts/seeds and cheese (feta, gorgonzola, cheddar) to all of my salads. I occasionally eat energy bars and rarely use protein powder.

It's definitely a challenge especially if you are limited by time, budget and/or cooking facilities. Probably one of the best things you could do is get a cheap rice cooker (the kind where you just press one button and it cooks the rice until the water's all gone). I've made entire meals in these things; all the way from sauteeing the vegetable, to cooking the pasta and frying rice (mine just has a spring under the pan and if you depress the pan, it'll cook anything). With a rice cooker, you can just put some rice on to cook before class; then when you come home in the evening, mix rice with canned beans and you have the basis of a solid meal (pretty cheap too).

There are a lot of resources for you to get more information:
www.vegweb.com for recipes
http://www.vegparadise.com/asknettiearchive.html for recipes and ideas on how to get stuff done quicker/less work
http://www.vegparadise.com/athlete.html for advice from a vegan athlete
http://www.nutritiondata.com/ for nutrional info on any food you can think of (you can even build recipes and profile them)
I'd also try searching for info on raw food diets if you're pressed for time


I hope all that helps.
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Postby splint » Fri Jan 04, 2008 6:24 am

Just for your information and if you find you're stuck and not making any gains, most vegetarian weight-training websites still advocate between 1.0 and 1.5 grams of protein per pound of bodyweight. 15% of your calories from protein will not meet that goal. While it's enough for a sedentary person, strenous exercise and weight training require more protein for muscle repair, I think. In a 2000 calorie diet, 15% protein would equal 75 grams.

But hey, if 75 grams of protein in your diet works and you're seeing results, no reason to change it. If you get stuck, it may be something to consider.
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Postby Admin » Fri Jan 04, 2008 10:01 am

Will she eat whey or egg protein powder? Those are good. I also hear good things about hemp protein. I avoid soy because it tends to coat the digestive track and block nutrient absorption.
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Postby gwmccull » Fri Jan 04, 2008 1:57 pm

splint wrote:15% of your calories from protein will not meet that goal. While it's enough for a sedentary person, strenous exercise and weight training require more protein for muscle repair, I think. In a 2000 calorie diet, 15% protein would equal 75 grams.


Note, that I said that 15% calories from protein is enough *if* you are receiving enough calories to cover your daily expenditures. An active person needs more than 2000 calories per day. I suppose if you were on a calorie restricted diet and trying to build muscle, you probably would need supplementation.
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Postby splint » Fri Jan 04, 2008 2:31 pm

gwmccull wrote:
splint wrote:15% of your calories from protein will not meet that goal. While it's enough for a sedentary person, strenous exercise and weight training require more protein for muscle repair, I think. In a 2000 calorie diet, 15% protein would equal 75 grams.


Note, that I said that 15% calories from protein is enough *if* you are receiving enough calories to cover your daily expenditures. An active person needs more than 2000 calories per day. I suppose if you were on a calorie restricted diet and trying to build muscle, you probably would need supplementation.


Right, but my point is 15% is 15%, regardless of how many calories your're consuming 15% of them from protein is not going to get you in the .8 grams per pound of bodyweight which is the RDA. Muscle building experts recomment 1.0 to 1.5 grams per pound of bodyweight. So, assuming the lowest (RDA) of .8 grams per bodyweight, you'd need 160 grams of protein if you weighed 200 pounds. That equals 640 calories from protein. 640 is 15% of 4266. So you'd need to eat 4266 calories per day to get the lowest recommended protein amount while using 15% of your calories from protein. And remember, that's assuming a sedentary lifestyle. That's way too many calories to get your minimum protein and that's not even taking into account muscle building. You'd need 5,333 calories to reach 1.0 grams per pound of bodyweight of protein using 15%.
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Postby gwmccull » Fri Jan 04, 2008 3:14 pm

splint wrote:Right, but my point is 15% is 15%, regardless of how many calories your're consuming 15% of them from protein is not going to get you in the .8 grams per pound of bodyweight which is the RDA. Muscle building experts recomment 1.0 to 1.5 grams per pound of bodyweight. So, assuming the lowest (RDA) of .8 grams per bodyweight, you'd need 160 grams of protein if you weighed 200 pounds. That equals 640 calories from protein. 640 is 15% of 4266. So you'd need to eat 4266 calories per day to get the lowest recommended protein amount while using 15% of your calories from protein. And remember, that's assuming a sedentary lifestyle. That's way too many calories to get your minimum protein and that's not even taking into account muscle building. You'd need 5,333 calories to reach 1.0 grams per pound of bodyweight of protein using 15%.


I believe that RDA is .8 grams of protein per kilogram of bodyweight, not pounds. Dieticians recommend that athletes receive 1.2 grams of protein per kilogram of bodyweight. The same dietician also has more information about the idea of 15% of calories coming from protein.

Here is a quote from the website:
http://www.dietitian.com/protein.html wrote:Protein should comprise 10 - 15% of total calories. So if you eat 1,200 calories a day, you only need 30 - 45 grams, but if you are eating 3,000 calories because of your regular activities and exercise program, then you need 75 - 113 grams.

Protein contributes 4 calories per gram. Take your calorie intake and multiply by 10% or 15%, then divide that number by 4 to get the grams of protein you should eat. Protein grams are listed on the new foods labels or you could use nutrition analysis software to track it for you.

Another consideration is what is your age and sex, which determines your RDA for protein. Studies have shown that most healthy persons can stay in positive nitrogen balance (body protein broken down equals body protein being built) on as little as 20 grams of high quality protein per day. Less than that, your body starts breaking down protein structures like internal organs and muscles which reduces your body's ability to function normally and resist disease.

Excess protein, above body needs, is used for fuel or converted to body fat. Any protein excreted is filtered out by the kidneys which usually retains proteins because they are large molecules in the blood. If you have a kidney infection though, protein will show up in your urine. So depending upon how much protein you are eating, you can stress your kidney function.

If you are weight lifting and concerned about increasing muscle mass, then focus on eating a balanced diet with the above amount of protein. If you want to gain weight, then increase calories with a proportionate amount of protein as above.
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Postby splint » Sat Jan 05, 2008 5:50 am

Freaking metric system. Tool of the devil. My car gets 40 rods to the hogshead and that's the way I likes it. :evil:

Weight training websites recommend 1.0 grams to 1.5 grams per pound of bodyweight. When I was losing weight I was limiting myself to 1900-2000 calories per day, now that I'm trying to build muscle I've been eating about 2700. Since I hit my low of 173 pounds, I've gained 4 pounds without changing my bodyfat %. So I'm pretty sure my calorie levels are correct and the weight increase was mostly muscle.

at 15% I'd be getting about 100 grams of protein, which is adequate, you're right. But it's not what the muscle building diets recommend. So I;m trying to get about 150 grams per day. That increases protein calories to 25-30%.

But like I said, that's just me. I don't recommend anyone take anyone's advice like it's gold, official dietician, government RDA board, friends, family members,or what have you. Try things out and figure out what works for you. If 15% helps yoiu build muscle go for it. If you're not seeing results, play with the percentages.
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